Obama Un-Cancels non-ACA Plans ... But Will ACA Plans Still be Affordable?

by Dave Hamilton in


Ok, so on the surface this is good for me. It lets me keep my plan. (Edit: no, it won't. New Hampshire has opted not to extend the cancelation deadline, likely for the reasons I originally detailed below).

But... we're also still mandating that insurance companies must take people with pre-existing conditions. And now we're (effectively) saying that – in those states where the no-longer-canceled policies were cheaper – people who could previously get insurance are not going to be mandated into ObamaCare.

So the math then tells me that, in those aforementioned states (like New Hampshire, but not New York*), the ObamaCare plans will only be used by those who previously couldn't get insurance, effectively making those plans high-risk plans, and raising those premiums up to the roof (just like they were for pre-ObamaCare high risk plans). 

Right? 

If correct, then what's the point? If we're going to do this, we can't split the baby and expect it to still be "affordable" for everyone. At least not according to my math. Am I wrong?

*The data I've seen shows that some states (New Hampshire, Florida, Texas) will see massive increases for previously-insured folks on individual plans while other states (like New York, where it was previously highly-regulated) will likely see rates drop with ObamaCare plans.

Source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/oba...